Recent Posts

Brain Health Center
Adult Autism: Beyond the School Years
Apr 26, 2017 By Emory Brain Health Center

Adult Autism ImageMost people think of high school graduation as an exciting new beginning. But to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it’s often a time of confusion, stress and flat-out fear. They must confront the reality and challenges of their kid’s adult autism. Depending on the state, educational supports and services received under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act will disappear. Dr. Cubells, Director of Medical and Adult Services at Emory Autism Center, says “What now?” is one of the most common questions that he hears.

Loss of Supports with Adult Autism

In the U.S., federal laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) ensure that children with ASD (and other disabilities) receive school-based supports to help them succeed. Supports may include speech or occupational therapy, a personal aide in the classroom and other interventions. Unfortunately, once school ends, so do these added supports. Leaving the school system can be the beginning of an arduous journey as families try to navigate their way through the adult world. The loss of support and services for young adults with ASD leaving high school is [...]

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Cosmetic Medicine
Types of Dermal Fillers – Benefits and Risks
Apr 21, 2017 By Dr. Anita Sethna

Dermal FillersThe world of facial injectable treatments can be overwhelming with all the options seen in print and TV ads. New injectable materials seem to come out almost weekly. Here is a run-down of the dermal fillers we most often use, where we use them, and some common side effects.

Hyaluronic Acid (HA)

The most frequently used dermal fillers are made of a material called hyaluronic acid (HA). Hyaluronic acid is a chemical structure found in our bodies — so most individuals tolerate the filler well, without side effects. The chemical structure of the molecule can be processed in different ways, giving us the ability to manipulate the thickness, the amount of volume and the longevity of the effects on your skin. This versatility is important because, depending on your particular area of concern, you may desire one benefit of the treatment over another. For example, you may desire additional volume and want the treatment to last a long time, but not need fine lines to be treated. On the other hand, you may desire smoker’s lines around the mouth to be improved, but not want a lot of volume or swelling in the mouth area. Hyaluronic acid fillers come packaged in a variety of [...]

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Transplant
Organ Donation Hits Close to Home – A Thankful Mother’s Story
Apr 20, 2017 By Emory Transplant Center

Organ Donation Hits Close to Home

D’Sean Bray, Heart Transplant Recipient

In December 2014, Renita Hylton, one of Emory Healthcare’s own, had to quickly familiarize herself with the subject of organ donation. She received the devastating news that her 17-year-old son, D’Sean Bray, was diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy that would require a lifesaving heart transplant. “I knew something was wrong. He was always very active, and then he began sleeping a lot. When he was admitted, his heart was only functioning at seven percent,” she recalls. D’Sean needed immediate open-heart surgery to save his life until a new heart would become available. He was quickly placed on the pediatric transplant list. D’Sean was receiving care from the pediatric cardiology team at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston when the family received news that a heart was available. “I was in disbelief,” says Renita. “I was happy, but at the same time sad knowing how we were getting the heart.” The donor was 14-year-old who lost his life in a traffic accident. The donor’s family made the selfless decision to have their son’s heart donated. “We met the donor’s family a few months after [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Total Ankle Replacement – Valerie's Story
Apr 13, 2017 By admin

Valerie's total ankle replacement

Valerie on Mount Kilimanjaro

After an accident in 1979 that resulted in an ankle injury, Valerie underwent surgery on her left ankle to repair the joint. At the time, total ankle replacement was in its infancy and regarded as an experimental procedure. It wasn’t until the late 80s and early 90s that advancements in design made total ankle replacement a viable option for patients. Initially, the ankle surgery worked, but after five years, Valerie began to experience constant pain at her ankle. Being resilient, she didn’t let the pain stop her from living her life, so she carried on without realizing that she had changed her gait to compensate for the pain. Valerie walked on the tips of her toes for 25 years! She didn’t anticipate the arthritic damage caused by changing her body’s natural movement or the pain it would cause in other areas of her body. After her husband’s successful knee surgery in 2010, she decided that there was still hope for her ankle. Valerie started to research and educate herself on treatment options for total ankle replacement. It was during this time that the years of walking on her toes finally caught up with her. Physical therapy [...]

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Transplant
Live Q&A Today: Giving the Gift of Life, Understanding Organ Donation
Apr 13, 2017 By admin

Donate Life = Organ DonationJoin us back here at noon (12 p.m. EST)

Hosted bySharon B. Mathews MS, RN, CPTC, Lead Transplant Coordinator, Living Kidney Donor Program April serves as National Donate Life month – raising awareness around organ donation and celebrating those who have given the precious gift of life to another. Currently, more than 123,000 men, women, and children are awaiting a lifesaving transplant. They are in need of organs, tissue, and bone marrow which can all be transplanted if donors were available, giving recipients a second chance at life. Understandably, potential donors may have reservations about organ donation. Get the facts and learn more about organ donation today at noon with Sharon Mathews, MS, RN, CPTC, of the Emory Transplant Center. She will answer all of your questions about organ donation, including how many people are currently waiting for an organ, what organs can be donated, and who can donate. Plus, she will discuss Emory Transplant Center’s living donor and paired donor exchange programs. [...]

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Transplant
April is National Donate Life Month
Apr 1, 2017 By admin

Emory Transplant Center Commemorates Organ Donation Month

Donate Life Organ Donation Logo Transplantation is one of the most remarkable success stories in the history of medicine, but the need for organ donation is greater than ever before. More than 123,000 men, women and children are on the national transplant list, within another person added every 10 minutes. Each April, we celebrate National Donate Life month to raise awareness around organ donation and honor the donors who have given the gift of life. Research shows that 95 percent of Americans are in favor of being a donor, yet only 48 percent are registered. Those awaiting a lifesaving transplant need organs, tissue and bone marrow. These can all be transplanted, giving recipients, and their families, a second chance at life. Emory Transplant Center is proud to play a part in transplantation – giving hope to thousands of people with organ failure and provides them and their families with active and renewed lives. Interested in becoming a donor but have questions?  The Emory Transplant Center along with Donate Life of Georgia has compiled a list of informative facts to help you with your decision to become an organ donor.

Organ

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Highlights
5 Things to Take to Your Doctor’s Appointment
Mar 31, 2017 By Emory Healthcare

A doctor’s appointment can be overwhelming and intimidating. To take the ease off the appointment process, make sure that you have all the essentials for a doctor's visit. Read this list of things to bring to your next appointment to make sure your visit goes a little smoother.

Your ID cards.

This includes both your driver’s license and medical insurance card. This will give the staff at your doctor’s office all the information they need to know about you and your health insurance. An electronic version of your insurance card is a good option too.

Changes to your medical record.

From new diagnoses to recent lab test to current medications (i.e., vitamins, supplements, and over-the-counter drugs), let your doctor know what is going on with you. I suggest that you make a list of the medications you take and bring a copy of any recent lab test results to your doctor's appointment. This will ensure that your physician has a complete picture of your health.

A log of your symptoms.

Try to go one step further from just a list of your symptoms, and instead create a log. This means take note of the types of symptoms you have, when these symptoms occur, and ways you [...]

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Cancer
Colorectal Cancer Awareness
Mar 30, 2017 By Winship Cancer Institute

Dr. Seth Rosen Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates there will be 95,520 new cases of colon cancer and 39,910 new cases of rectal cancer in 2017.

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Most colorectal cancers start as a growth, called a polyp, in the inner lining of the colon or rectum and slowly progresses through the other layers. Removing a noncancerous polyp early can keep it from becoming a cancerous tumor, which is why screening is such an important tool for preventing this disease.

Colorectal Cancer Symptoms

Colorectal cancer doesn’t always cause symptoms. It’s important to get screened regularly. If you do have symptoms, they may include:
  • Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that don’t go away
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Blood in stool
  • Unintended weight loss
If you develop symptoms, it’s important to talk to your doctor immediately.

Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors

Your risk for developing colorectal cancer increases as you get older. Younger adults can get colorectal cancer, but more than 90% of cases occur in people who are 50 years old or older. Other risk [...]

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Highlights
Allergies: Know Where to Go to Get Relief This Season
Mar 24, 2017 By Nick E. Colovos, MD, MBA, FACEP, FAAEM

For allergy and asthma sufferers in Atlanta, there are effectively three seasons: summer, winter and pollen. With a warmer than average winter, high pollen counts have already been reported across the U.S. In Atlanta, this warmer than usual weather triggered an early release of tree pollen. As a result, pollen counts started rising in mid-February. This means allergy season is already here — which may seem unfair, considering we are still at the tail end of flu season. Click here to learn more about pollen counts and what the numbers mean. Respiratory allergies, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (also called hay fever), flare up because of a heightened immune system response to pollen particles. Allergic rhinitis produces the typical sneezing and runny nose associated with pollen season, as well as itchy watery eyes. You can also experience itching in your ears, nose and throat. For some people, this is mildly irritating but can be handled by staying indoors when pollen counts are high. Symptoms are also treatable with over-the-counter or prescription medications. A primary care physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant can help. Older adults, [...]

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Transplant
Good Morning America Pays Tribute to a Transplant Recipient's Wife
Mar 23, 2017 By admin

It all started with a Facebook post…Raleigh Callaway, a veteran Georgia police officer and patient of the Emory Transplant Center, needed a kidney transplant. Desperate to find a match as he entered the late stages of renal failure, he and his wife, Kristi Callaway, turned to social media to find a potential donor. Kristi posted a message on Facebook sharing Raleigh’s need for a kidney. The post resulted in more than 900 people contacting the Emory Transplant Center – one of whom was Chris Carroll, a health care consultant and grandfather from McKinney, Texas. He saw the Callaway family pictured on Facebook with their two children holding a sign that read, “Our Daddy Needs a Kidney.” Chris said he felt divinely led to call to see if he could become a donor. On Thursday, September 25, 2014, Raleigh received Chris’ kidney. Both recipient and donor are doing well. But even after her husband found a kidney, Kristi Callaway continued her mission of supporting organ donations and helping to connect individuals in need of a kidney with donors from across the country. So far she has save 23 lives by connecting kidney donors to those in need. Good Morning America [...]

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